First “bomb” Cyclone of Fall 2010


I have been so transfixed with the large cyclone transitioning into a vigorous shortwave trough across the western U.S. lately I had paid little attention to weather events along the east coast.  My special love for vertically propagating mountain waves, downslope windstorms, and intermountain/mountain west weather in general may have blinded me (albeit very briefly) slightly to the events along the other coast of America.  I apologize, and I ask for forgiveness from any east coasters I know.

WV imagery during the initial stages of rapid deepening:

12 hours later.  Note the rapid increase in mid-upper tropospheric moisture as the system interacts with the Gulf Stream.  Also note the rapid development of a significant “dry-slot” off the east coast–quite common in rapidly intensifying cyclones (will also go more in-depth during later posts…more complex dynamically and thermodynamically than one may think!) :

No analysis needed here (I will do a more thorough analysis of the dynamics and thermodynamics sometime this winter).  The interaction of Canadian cold air advection and the semipermanent zone of baroclinity along the Gulf Stream results in some of the most spectacular weather in the U.S. during the fall/winter.

Surface pressure falls at Portsmouth, NH.  27 mb/20 hours, and the very impressive nearly 15 mb in the last 5 hours:

The late renowned MIT professor Dr. Fred Sanders, a synoptician for whom I have the utmost respect for, was the first to “coin” the term bomb in the case of rapid marine cyclogenesis.  http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/10.1175/1520-0493(1980)108%3C1589:SDCOT%3E2.0.CO;2

Update:

Portsmouth, NH finally reached a low pressure of 982 mb and nearly 35 mb/24 hrs.

Atmospheric Bombogenesis.  Fred Sanders would be proud.  Enjoy the spectacular satellite signature:


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About jason ahsenmacher

I am a meteorologist, and I like baroclinic instability. View all posts by jason ahsenmacher

2 responses to “First “bomb” Cyclone of Fall 2010

  • Inudaw

    Great info here regarding the processes leading up to the storm that affected the north east on the 14th of October.

    Especially liked the two water vapor images highlighting the classic baroclinic leaf structure to that of the deepening cyclone image. Can literally draw three belts of the classic Norwegian cyclone model.

  • jason ahsenmacher

    I agree, what a beautiful storm. Those last two visible satellite images are awesome.

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